Biomimicry Institute
Biomimicry in the Built Environment

Evaporation: Closing the Gap between Forest and Urban Water Flows

Evaporation: Closing the Gap between Forest and Urban Water Flows

Have you ever walked through an evergreen forest in the rain? There is a hush all around. The forest floor is spongy and soft beneath your feet, and the layers and textures all around you create a coziness, a feeling of being protected. As you take a deep breath of fresh, clean air, you know it’s raining big drops up above, but all you feel is a cool mist floating down through the canopy.

You can find expansive sections of this forest all around Puget Sound. For many people, it is a mental and spiritual health reservoir, a place that helps us reconnect and remember that we are nature. But it is also an ecosystem services powerhouse. It stores carbon, cleans the air and water, regulates temperatures, and provides shelter and food for critters big and small.

Nine Reasons Why Applying Biomimicry to Built Environment Projects is a Win-Win-Win

Nine Reasons Why Applying Biomimicry to Built Environment Projects is a Win-Win-Win

Designers in the building industry are continually looking for new and innovative ways to create beautiful, livable spaces that are environmentally responsible and resilient. Increasingly, those on the leading edge are looking to nature as a source of inspiration. Here are nine examples of how applying biomimicry in the context of the built environment can help designers, projects, and communities as they work to create naturally sustainable, inherently resilient spaces.

Tap into nature anywhere: