Stories from the field:

Around the globe, students and professionals are building a more sustainable world by learning from nature.

“The Experience Gave Us Hope:”

How the Biomimicry Student Design Challenge started an Egyptian designer on a path to help her country.

Breaking Down Barriers

A design team from Mexico transforms a biomimicry challenge win into a thriving new interdisciplinary consultancy.

100 Students. Five Teachers. Nine Weeks. One Big Challenge.

How a group of teachers from San Diego’s Kearny High School challenged their “city kids” to fix our food system using biomimicry.

Building on Community Knowledge

Learning flows two ways when a biomimicry team works with an informal settlement in South Africa to better lives and water quality.

Creating A Biomimicry Hub in NE Ohio

After four years and thousands of volunteer hours, the Great Lakes Biomimicry Network has created a biomimicry hot spot in the region, powered by educational partnerships.

“The Experience Gave Us Hope:”

How the Biomimicry Student Design Challenge started an Egyptian designer on a path to help her country.

When Nariman Lotfi, a design student at Egypt’s German University in Cairo, learned about biomimicry for the first time, something clicked.

Lotfi didn’t know it at the time, but this discovery was the start of a journey that would take her from the classroom, to the stagnant canals in the region, and over 5,000 miles west to Boston to accept a first-place award from biomimicry pioneer Janine Benyus. Now, she’s committed to developing a career that uses nature-inspired design to tackle tough sustainability issues in Egypt.

Breaking Down Barriers

A design team from Mexico transforms a biomimicry challenge win into a thriving new interdisciplinary consultancy.

Two days before they were about to give the biggest presentation of their lives, Diana Vega and her team from the Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán found themselves in a fluorescent-lit supermarket, over 3,000 miles from home, on a mission to find toothpicks and cardboard.

100 students. Five teachers. Nine weeks. One big challenge.

How a group of teachers from San Diego’s Kearny High School challenged their “city kids” to fix our food system using biomimicry.

Think back to when you were in high school. Now, imagine how cool it would have been to learn about the world in a new way–by working to solve one of the world’s biggest sustainability challenges.

For students at Kearny High School’s Foster School of Engineering, Innovation and Design in San Diego, CA, this was a reality. In January 2015, a team of teachers incorporated the Biomimicry Global Design Challenge on food systems into the entire 10th grade curriculum, challenging the students to design a healthier food system using biomimicry.

Building on Community Knowledge

Learning flows two ways when a biomimicry team works with an informal settlement in South Africa to better lives and water quality.

Picture this: A community made up of mostly farming families establishes their homes on the banks of the Berg River in an area called Langrug in South Africa. The problem? Langrug is what is called an informal settlement and has grown and expanded with limited access to electricity, plumbing, sewer, stormwater management, and other government or city-provided systems. The result? The Berg River—their lifeblood—has become terribly polluted.

Creating a Biomimicry Hub in NE Ohio

After four years and thousands of volunteer hours, the Great Lakes Biomimicry network has created a biomimicry hot spot in the region, powered by education partnerships.

Tom Tyrrell and Don Knechtges thought big right from the start. When the two veteran entrepreneurs and environmentalists teamed up to foster biomimicry-based regional economic development in northeastern Ohio, they began with one key approach: education.

“We felt that what no one else in the world was doing was using education as a fulcrum to move towards economic development.” said Tyrrell, founder of Great Lakes Biomimicry.

Join us, wherever you are:

We believe that the widespread adoption of nature-inspired solutions will catalyze a new era in design and business that benefits both people and the planet. Let’s make the act of asking nature’s advice a normal part of everyday inventing. We hope you will join us.

Tap into nature anywhere: